This webpage is part of www.janzuidhoek.com, which is a website promoting [Jan Zuidhoek (2021) Reconstructing Metonic 19-year Lunar Cycles (on the basis of NASA’s Six Millennium Catalog of Phases of the Moon): Zwolle], and reproduces the table containing the five Alexandrian Metonic 19-year lunar cycles being part of this groundbreaking book, which is available via this website.

 

 

 

 

Five Alexandrian Metonic 19‑year Lunar Cycles

 

 

Anatolius’ 19‑year lunar cycle

archetypal

Alexandrian cycle

Festal Index 19‑year lunar cycle 

Theophilus’ 19‑year lunar cycle

classical

Alexandrian cycle

AD

304

305

306

307

308

309

310

311

312

313

314

315

316

317

318

319

320

321

322

8 April

28 March

16 April

5 April

24 March

12 April

1 April

20 April

9 April

29 March

17 April

6 April

26 March

14 April

3 April

23 March

11 April

31 March

19 April

6 April

26 March

13 April

2 April

22 March

10 April

30 March

18 April

7 April

27 March

15 April

4 April

24 March

12 April

1 April

21 March

9 April

29 March

17 April

6 April

26 March

14 April

2 April

22 March

10 April

30 March

18 April

7 April

27 March

15 April

4 April

24 March

12 April

1 April

21 March

9 April

29 March

17 April

6 April

26 March

13 April

2 April

22 March

10 April

30 March

18 April

7 April

27 March

15 April

4 April

24 March

12 April

1 April

21 March

9 April

29 March

17 April

5 April

25 March

13 April

2 April

22 March

10 april

30 March

18 April

7 April

27 March

15 April

4 April

24 March

12 April

1 April

21 March

9 April

29 March

17 April

Table 8: Comparing the two lost ante-Nicene and the three well‑known postNicene Alexandrian Metonic 19-year lunar cycles to each other

 

 

Anatolius’ 19-year lunar cycle is the lost Metonic 19‑year lunar cycle from which the great Alexandrian computist Anatolius, bishop of Laodicea (Syria) from AD 268 to his death in about AD 282, ultimately started in order to construct his famous 19‑year Paschal cycle. The archetypal Alexandrian 19-year lunar cycle, also simply referred to as the archetypal Alexandrian cycle, is the lost ante‑Nicene common archetype of the three well-known post‑Nicene Alexandrian Metonic 19‑year lunar cycles. Both of these Metonic 19‑year lunar cycles were both constructed (before the council of Nicaea in AD 325) and reconstructed (recently) mutatis mutandis according to four computistical principles: the principle concerning the spring equinox, the principle concerning the crescent moon, the principle of periodicity, and the principle of metonicity.

The Festal Index 19-year lunar cycle, also simply referred to as the Festal Index cycle, must have been obtained from the archetypal Alexandrian cycle by replacing its date 13 April with 14 April. Theophilus’ 19‑year lunar cycle must have been obtained by bishop Theophilus of Alexandria by adopting the archetypal Alexandrian cycle or by adapting , or correcting, the Festal Index 19‑year lunar cycle by replacing its date 14 April with 13 April. The classical Alexandrian 19-year lunar cycle, also simply referred to as the classical Alexandrian cycle, is Annianus’ 19-year lunar cycle, being the Metonic 19‑year lunar cycle opted for by the Alexandrian monk and great computist Annianus (in about AD 412) and subsequently adopted by bishop Cyril of Alexandria (in about AD 425). The classical Alexandrian cycle forms the Metonic structure underlying both Dionysius Exiguus’ Paschal table (composed in about AD 525) and Beda Venerabilis’ Easter table (composed before or in AD 725).

We observe that there exists a gap of about 2 days between on the one hand Anatolius’ 19‑year lunar cycle and on the other hand the other four Alexandrian Metonic 19‑year lunar cycles; this gap dates from before the council of Nicaea in AD 325 (because the archetypal Alexandrian cycle dates from before this council), and is therefore referred to as the ante‑Nicene Alexandrian 2‑day gap.

 

 

 

 

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